2018 Year in Review

Believe it or not, December is in full swing. I feel like I just finished writing my 2017 Year in Review post and here we are once again. I say it all the time, but where has the time gone?

Every year, I set personal and professional goals for myself. It’s the perfect exercise for me to pause and reflect on where I’ve been and figure out where I’d like to go moving forward. I do some check in’s throughout the year to see how things are going but now that it’s December it only seems right to take a peek at how the year really went down. I’m still in awe of everything that I accomplished (personally and professionally). I have a ton of wins but here are some highlights for the year:

 

I got my level 2 reiki certification

This past February, I took the next step in my journey with reiki and got Level 2 Certified in the Usui System. Reiki has transformed my life and my love has only grown over the past year. I ended up offering my services during my lunch break to my coworkers at the office in order to get more practice. During the summer, I also ended up doing a mentorship with my reiki instructor.

 

I presented at my first conference

During 2017, I submitted a proposal to present at The eLearning Guild’s Learning Solutions conference in Orlando, FL. Much to my surprise it was approved! The event took place this past March. It was my first ever conference presentation and I remember being absolutely terrified! During my session, Adopting the Performance Support Mindset, I shared my journey implementing performance support at The Predictive Index. It was such a great opportunity to connect with others looking to implement performance support solutions. The audience was so receptive – it made me wonder why I was even nervous in the first place. I have a feeling it won’t be the last time I present at a conference.

 

I made my side consulting gig more official

During 2017, I took on my first consulting gig by partnering with my friend Steve Seinberg from Arrow in Flight. This year, I wanted to take it to the next level. I ended up reaching out directly to a potential client and getting the gig! I love providing product, learning, and UX services to companies related to health, wellness, and technology. I also got some great feedback along the way. I hope to continue to grow my consulting services over the next few years.

 

I learned how to say goodbye

The most difficult decision of the year was deciding to step away from my post at The Predictive Index after 3.5 years. I felt so strongly about taking the next step in my professional life that I decided to give 2 months notice to my boss without even having a job lined up. Talk about a risk! My family definitely wasn’t happy with the decision but I told them that something good would be on the horizon soon. Little did I know, just what was in store next!

 

I won a 30 under 30 award!

A week after I gave notice to my boss, I found out that I was being recognized in the 30 under 30 group at Elliot Masie’s Learning 2018 event. It was just what I needed to feel more confident about the unknown path ahead. This past November, I attended the event in Orlando, FL. It was such a great opportunity! I got to meet with 29 other learning leaders and we even received an entire day of leadership development with the program.

 

I completed my graduate certificate at Boise State

In January 2016, I embarked on the path to complete my Masters in Organizational Performance and Workplace Learning (OPWL) with Boise State. At the same time, I also decided to sign up to complete a Graduate Certificate in Workplace E-Learning and Performance Support as an add-on with the program. Over the past 2 years, I’ve been tirelessly chugging along with my studies, completing one course per semester while working at the same time.

This past summer, I finished the final course in the graduate certificate program! Receiving my certificate in the mail gave me some much needed encouragement to finish out the last 2 semesters of my masters program strong.

IMG_9234.jpg

 

I became a Product Manager at Pluralsight

A month after I gave notice at my job, I accepted a position as Role IQ Product Manager at Pluralsight. Transitioning over to Product Management was a decision that came after countless months of research and self reflection. And once again, I have no idea why it took me so long to make the leap. But things always happen when they’re meant to.

I just finished up my first 2 months at Pluralsight and in that time, I’ve seen myself grow in ways I never imagined. I’m so excited to see where the next few months take me in my role.

 

I learned an important lesson about work-life balance

A week before starting my new role at Pluralsight, I ended up falling down the stairs on the way to meet my new team members in the office. I fractured my ankle and tore 2 ligaments. I had to have surgery and was unable to put any weight on my ankle for 2 entire months. The experience gave me no other choice but to rest (a blessing in disguise). For the past two years, I was juggling working full time and grad classes and essentially making no time for rest.

The time was just what I needed to reflect, reset, and let my body heal. I am nowhere near out of the clear. I will likely need to have an additional surgery to remove screws from my ankle and months of PT until I can engage in my usual activities again. As of 3 weeks ago, I started walking again for the first time and I have a renewed sense for gratitude for things that everyone take for granted such as walking.

 

Looking ahead

To say this year was a journey is quite an understatement. I am so proud of where this year has taken me. I’m already thinking ahead to what 2019 will bring, but before then I’m looking forward to enjoying the holidays with my friends and family. See you on the other side of the new year!

Lessons Learned from Learning 2018

This week, I attended Elliott Masie’s Learning 2018 in Orlando, FL. It was my first time attending the event and to top it off I was apart of the 30 under 30 group. Overall, it was a great experience. For those that haven’t attended Elliott Masie’s Learning conference before, it is 2.5 days long and jammed packed with all things learning. I was definitely nervous to travel over 1,200 miles with my knee scooter (I’m still recovering from my fractured ankle!). Looking back, i’m so happy I decided to get over my fear and make the trek to Florida. It was a great opportunity to connect with others in the industry and hear about some of their experiences. Below are some highlights from the trip:

30 under 30 

The day before the official start to the conference was an entire day dedicated to professional development for the 30 under 30 group. We heard insights from some industry greats including: Elliott Masie, Bob Mosher, Richard Culatta, Bruce Wilkinson, Nigel Eyre, and Jayzen Patria. We even had a CLO panel including Tara Deakin (TD Bank), Rob Lauber (McDonalds), and Martha Soehren (Comcast).

Two things really resonated with me during these sessions, focused on career transitions and continuous learning. At one point Elliott actually said, “Really good people leave Learning and Development for sales or other departments because they’re so good at what they do”. Meanwhile, during the CLO Panel, each learning executive mentioned the importance of continuously challenging yourself when you meet your goals. It is not enough to set a goal and then settle, you much keep stretching yourself outside the box to see how far you can push yourself. Each of them also detailed a major change they made in their career by jumping either industries, roles, or locations.

These are EXACTLY the things that have been ruminating over in my mind when deciding to make the leap to Product Management. Hearing about the importance of challenge and career transitions really made me more confident and happy about all of the changes I’ve been making over the past few months.

IMG_9556
Learning 2018 – 30 under 30 

Industry Trends

I was able to attend over 8 sessions during the conference and noticed some trends occurring in the industry:

Frustration about being order takers

This is definitely nothing new but a common theme I noticed was the frustration among L+D Practitioners had about being order takers from stakeholders within their businesses. Many described hearing things such as “We need a 5 day course in X”, “We need 3 e-learning modules in Y”. I think this really emphasizes the importance of needs assessment by practitioners. It is our duty to partner not only with our stakeholders but learners and really dig down and identify the problems that are taking place so that we can create the best solutions possible to truly impact performance. We need to educate our partners and let them know that training is only one piece of the puzzle and there are many different tools at our disposal. At the end of the day, as learning practitioners we are responsible for helping our learners and ensuring that they’re performing.

 

Analytics aren’t whats coming soon – they’re already here

I attended 2 sessions on learning analytics, metrics, and measurement. I found these sessions particularly interesting because I just released a beta feature for my product which included an analytics dashboard for companies to track metrics on their employees skills assessments. It seemed that many at the conference had no idea where to start with data or were completely overwhelmed with the amount of data they had to shift through.

It really emphasized the importance of being thoughtful about the type of data that we’re collecting to improve performance improvement. Through identifying the KPIs and metrics from the outset of a project, we can make ensure that were continuously tracking progress and determining whether were meeting the goals of our learners and organization. I mean, how else are we going to be able to prove we’re having an impact? I really encourage all practitioners to add metrics as another tool in their toolbox.

 

The Importance of Adopting a Business Mindset

What truly terrified me was the lack of alignment among practitioners whether they consider their learning solutions to be an actual product. I might be biased because of my recent move to product management. However, during the CLO panel I actually posed the question to the executives if they considered the solutions their organizations are creating as being learning products. Each one of them, one by one said no. I couldn’t believe it!  Just sessions earlier, Elliott Masie mentioned the importance of adopting a business mindset within the learning industry.

A product can be considered something that helps a user fulfill a need. As Practitioners, we’re creating learning products whether it’s in the form of elearning, instructor led training, performance support, or something else. We’re trying to help our learners perform better or have some type of performance improvement outcome. I truly cannot stress enough the importance of adopting this mindset. As practitioners, if we consider ourselves as delivering products I think we will think more holistically about the solutions we’re providing. It will also change the way that were creating solutions at a very foundational level.

Overall, Learning 2018 was such a wonderful experience. As always the best part was being able to connect with like minds in the industry. I am so grateful for the connections and conversations that I made over the past few days and I look forward for continuing them for years to come!

Transforming the future of technology learning: 10 years in the making

Ten years ago, I sat in the passengers seat of my fathers Honda Ridgeline as we drove by the Niagara River in Buffalo, NY. My father, a machinist of over 20 years, shared his regrets about how he wished he continued his education. “Education is the only thing that someone can never take away from you” he said, as I listened intently.  He shared his hopes about how I would continue school and chase my dreams despite any obstacles that may get into my way. This conversation has always stayed with me and I frequently think back to it during moments of self reflection.

It should come as no surprise that since then, education and learning have become ingrained into every ounce of my being. My core philosophy in life is that learning is the basis for growth and change. I believe that every experience you have and person you encounter has something to teach you as long as you’re willing to listen. I believe that learning is a fundamental right regardless of gender, race, income level, or where you were born. This belief has guided me through constantly juggling reading at least 3 books at all times (true story – check my goodreads account), undergraduate and graduate degrees, and now the next step in my career.

Thats why, I am absolutely thrilled to announce that I will be joining Pluralsight as a Product Manager.

 

Why Product at Puralsight?

When I began my job search, I knew I wanted a role that would challenge me, align with my learning philosophy, and allow me to make a profound impact on the world.

Product Manager – The epitome of a challenging role

Never in a million years could I have imagined that the next step in my career would be a Product Manager! I’ve worked in tandem with product managers for the past 3.5 years at The Predictive Index and I’ve seen first hand how challenging of a position it can be. So when a good friend of mine actually recommended it to me over 6 months ago, I practically laughed in his face. But as things often do, the idea began to spread through my mind. After countless conversations with those in the SaaS industry, a ton of research (books, conferences, etc), and coaching with my manager; I found myself ready to take on the product manager role. I recognized that a lot of the skills I’ve been utilizing in Learning and UX and all the skills I’m looking to grow we’re encapsulated within a PM role.

 

An aligned mission driven learning philosophy

This past March, I attended UX Fest in Boston and was fortunate enough to see Gilbert Lee, Head of Product @ Pluralsight present. His presentation immediately resonated with me as he talked about the future of workplace technical learning. I remember sitting in the audience thinking “This is why I started in learning!!!”.

The future of workplace education has fascinated me since I began my career in the learning industry nearly 6 years ago. It’s what drove me to pursue my masters in Organizational Performance and Workplace Learning with Boise State and is now what led me to my new role at Pluralsight.

The moment I began talking to the team at Pluralsight, I knew that learning was something that the organization was fundamentally committed to. From considering learning theories during the product development process to their iterative testing culture; learning is truly a shared philosophy across the entire organization.

Overall, I believe that providing just in time digital training is something that is necessary for workers to perform their best on the job. I have always been committed to making that happen for my learners and am grateful to be within an organization that is committed and driven to do the same.

 

Ready for takeoff

I’m so humbled and thrilled to be joining the Pluralsight team! I am so excited to see where this next chapter takes me.

Uncovering the power of the journey map

The farther I get into my masters program, the more I realize how quickly 10 weeks can go by. This past semester was an absolute whirlwind – now that I’m more than two weeks out of it, I feel like I finally have some time to share all the cool tidbits that I learned.

This past semester, I took an Advanced Instructional Design course that specifically focused on how to incorporate design thinking into the instructional design process. As expected, it was an absolute dream come true! It made me so much more confident in the skills that I’ve been learning in my LXD role over the past year. It also allowed me to connect with Learning Practitioners who were new to design thinking (queue flash backs to me 9 months ago).

One of my favorite parts of the class was learning more about journey maps. I was pretty much a novice to journey maps before the course. I had assisted our UX Researcher, Zoya, at times when she was constructing an epic journey map for The Predictive Index. Despite that, I had never built a journey map from scratch. The course changed all that and they’re now my go to at work when thinking about designing new user flows or even thinking about client journeys with our product.

 

What is a journey map?

Nielsen Norman Group describes a journey map as a “visualization of the process that a person goes through in order to accomplish a goal. It’s used for understanding and addressing customer needs and pain points”. My favorite part about a journey map is that it truly combines storytelling with visualization.

Journey maps can be a really helpful tool to put things back into perspective of what the user, customer, or learner is going through. In other words, journey maps are great to use during the empathy stage of design thinking. Overall, they can be used to review the existing state of an experience or when envisioning a future state. Once a journey map is created you’ll be able to identify pain points or areas of opportunity for building better experiences for customers.

01.png
Example Customer Journey Map for Online Travel Agency (Source)

 

Elements of a journey map

The truth is no journey map is the same however, they will include some similar elements:

  • Persona – this will provide insight about who the journey map is about. It may include elements such as a picture and goals/expectations of the person
  • Scenario – the experience you’re going to map. For example, is it an existing process or experience or are you going to be envisioning the future state of something?
  • Phases  – these are touch points that client/user interacts with your product or service.
  • Actions/Mindsets/Emotions – for each touch point, determine the action the user takes, their thoughts, emotional experience and potential opportunities.

 

xid-28027069_1.png
Job Applicant Journey Map (Source)

 

Basing the journey on data

Now before you run off and start creating journey maps for all the experiences your customers are going through, you’ll want to ensure that you’re basing them off of data and research. This means getting as close to your user or customer as possible through things like user interviews and surveys. This will help to ensure that the experience you’re mapping is grounded and based on the actual experience your clients are going through.

During the Advanced Instructional Design Course, my teammates and I worked on designing a learning experience for volunteers at a Cat Shelter. We parsed through nearly 200 pages of existing documentation and conducted our own user interviews. Talk about a lot of data! As part of our design solution, we created a journey map for a potential learning experience. This helped our group to envision all of the emotions, goals, motivations, and actions that the learner would potentially go through with our solution. Once we had more insight into the learner, we used all of the information to help us identify potential learning opportunities that would help them along their journey.

CatVolunteer_JourneyMap
Journey Map for Cat Shelter Volunteers

Overall, I ended up falling in love with journey maps throughout the course of the past semester. They’re another tool, I’m happy to add into my toolbox. I could see them being used by learning designers to gain more insight into learners.

So go on, what’re you waiting for? I hope you give journey maps a try and end up loving them as much as I do!

 

NOTE: If you’re a learning practitioner looking to incorporate design thinking into your process feel free to give me a shout 🙂

 

 

 

 

Lost without a paddle: My journey into the uncharted waters of learning experience design

Anyone looking for L&D jobs over the past few years may have noticed a growing trend – the move away from the label Instructional Designer and move towards Learning Experience Designer.

I experienced this shift first hand after being promoted to Learning Experience Designer within my organization 9 months ago. The move uprooted me from our learning team and placed me right in the middle of our small but mighty cross-functional user experience team.

To say the transition was a challenge is a complete understatement! I very quickly had to begin applying concepts I never encountered before like design thinking, prototyping, and iteration within my content creation process. Despite the initial growing pains, I have now settled firmly into my role in Learning Experience Designer and understand the need for instructional designers to shift to a learning experience design mindset.

What is learning experience design?

I would define Learning Experience Design as the practice of creating learning experiences that enables learners to achieve a desired performance outcome. Learning Experience Design uses an iterative approach that focuses on understanding the users challenges and experiences to design iterative solutions to help solve their needs.

This doesn’t mean limiting learning experiences to formal learning that take place in a school or classroom. Quite the opposite, learning experiences can take place anywhere; at home, while working, or on the go.

Learning Experience Designers focus on the holistic learning experience and what the learner is going through. This means that rather than simply focusing on designing curriculum or instruction, the learning experience designer will consider the learner and everything they’re experiencing. They’ll then use that information to create solutions such as:

  • content (what does the learner need to do in order to perform a task)
  • the look and feel of the learning experience
  • materials
  • communication about the content
  • how the learner interacts with the content

Incorporating learning experience into digital products

If you’re like me, you may not immediately think about learning experience when thinking of the design of digital products. Digital products actually offer a number of learning experiences to customers, ranging from:

  • onboarding
  • learning the interface
  • learning how to interact with the product
  • help & support

Before my jump to LXD, I spent nearly 3 years creating software support content for clients. This ranged from creating help videos, how to articles, getting started guides, and more. During this time, I was often brought in after the software was built to explain to users how to use the system.

My move into learning experience actually transplanted me to the beginning of the design process. Now i’m working on our UX team where we handle designing product concepts that could potentially go within our software platform. This means establishing empathy with our users, gaining an understanding of their problems, and designing solutions to help solve the challenge. My deliverables usually range from creating wireframes, user flows, low fidelity prototypes of product features, and UX content.

I’m very fortunate that my organization is a test bed for new ideas. Since the transition, I’ve been able to work on some pretty exciting projects like designing in-software user onboarding for our beta software, designing wireframes and user flows for new features, and creating support materials for a new beta product.

Overall, the past 9 months have been quite the learning experience. The change taught me how to incorporate design-thinking, user centered design, prototyping, and iteration to my approach. I’ve been forced to think more strategically about getting to the root of a users problem and identify their pain points. This has improved the speed of my design  and allowed me solve our users problems quicker. In a world that is moving faster at every moment, a more strategic and agile design process will be what sets learning design apart from the pack.

Interested in learning more about learning experience? Check out these helpful resources:

Using information mapping to write clearer content

Last month, I sat down with some of my coworkers to officially hand off knowledge base responsibilities. Since transitioning more fully into my LXD role, I haven’t had the bandwidth to manage them anymore. It was a little bitter sweet, but it’s so exciting to see others step up to the plate and expand their skills.

I ended up reviewing some information mapping best practices to get the team more familiar with creating learning content. The session was so energizing! It reminded me of how much I love getting in front of people to share best practices and how much information mapping has helped to craft my content creation process.

What is information mapping?

Information Mapping is a researched based method that helps enable the creation of clear, concise, and focused writing. It allows content creators to put users needs at the forfont of the creation process.

I got trained in the information mapping methodology roughly 2 years ago and it’s helped every type of content I create. Everything from emails, presentations, documentation, help content, knowledge base articles, the sky’s the limit!

Below is an example before and after it went through the information mapping process. As you can see, information mapping can help to make the content more readable and bring important details to the front of the messages you’re crafting.

beforeafterbig3
Information Mapping – Before and After Example

Getting Started with Information Mapping

You don’t have to go through an information mapping training course to start using it! Here’s some guiding principles to help get you started:

Identify audience needs 

Whenever you’re creating content of any type of content, the first thing you’ll want to do is find out as much as you can about your audience. Ask yourself questions such as:

  • Who is the audience?
  • Are there multiple audiences?
  • What do they need to do?
  • What do they need to KNOW in order to do the task?
  • How will they access the information?

audience

Knowing this will help guide the information you present to your users and make sure that it truly resonates with them.

 

Organize information from the user’s perspective

Once you have a better idea of the content the users will need to know,  it’s time to focus on how you’ll actually present it to your audience.

Screen Shot 2018-05-26 at 1.25.56 PMBe sure to present the content in the order the users will need to use it. This often means introducing high level conceptual information first, then drilling down into more detailed content or steps later.Take a book for example; they’re often composed of multiple short chapters, rather than one long chapter of content. Each chunk of content should represent a new idea or topic.

 

Help users find what they need

Now that you’ve got your content down, it’s time to make some improvements to ensure that users can find the content they need.

Whenever I’m writing instructions or documents, I’ll add subheaders or descriptors to the content chunks in my document. The subheading should accurately convey what appears in it’s corresponding section. If the user is looking for something specific in your document, they’ll be able to quickly find what they’re looking for within the content.

Another best practice that i’ll do when writing directions is begin all sentences or steps with action verbs. For example, this means starting software how to’s with words such as “Click”, “Enter”, or “Select”. This puts the action that the user needs perform, front and center, ensuring theres absolutely no guess work on their end.

I’ll also emphasize words of importance by using italics, bold, or using all caps. In some cases, I’ll actually insert tips if something is really important to the user (ex: TIP: Changing this field will change all of your admin settings).

Finally, I’ll add supportive graphics throughout the document to help ensure that I get my point across. This means including pictures of software screens, machinery, or tools, you’re expecting the users to assemble or use.

Screen Shot 2018-05-27 at 2.13.28 PM
Example Instructions from The Predictive Index Knowledge Base

 

Putting it in action 

And that’s it! The next time you sit down to craft content, begin to incorporate some of these best practices to start getting your messages across to your users quicker.  So go on, and get your information mapping on!

 

Catch me if you can: A midyear check-in

Spring time is in full effect here in Providence, RI!

The first half of the year has proven to be quite busy. Just within the past month, I finished up my spring semester and moved my entire apartment to the East Side of Providence, RI.

giphy

Yep, you heard that right! My month off in between classes was no cake walk. I traded in my solo apartment in Pawtucket, RI and took a leap to the city. During the transition, I also took a hard look at the 2018 goals I set up for myself. I realized I’ve already completed roughly 65% of them and it’s not even the end of May! To say i’m exhausted is an understatement.

So, whats up next?

As I start to look at the second half of the year, I’m beyond excited to see what’s in store.

Next week, I’ll be starting an Advanced Instructional Design course (my last class to complete my Workplace eLearning and Performance Support certificate with Boise State)! The class will focus on incorporating user experience practices like journey mapping, personas, and prototyping into the learning design process. If it sounds right up my alley, thats because it is! The past 8 months have been a huge transition to my LXD role, so i’m excited to learn more about theories and gain more confidence in the work that i’m doing.

Another focus for the coming months will be slowing down, reflecting, and creating. I hope to redesign my personal website, write more, and do all the artsy stuff I used to have more time for.

So heres to a rocking start to 2018. I can’t wait to see where we all end up in the next few months!

Using Design Thinking to Craft Learning Experiences

Last month I was fortunate to attend a Design Thinking workshop with the eLearning guru Connie Malamed. After reading Connie’s blog for over 8 years  I was beyond psyched for the opportunity to meet her in person!

The workshop was absolutely wonderful (as expected) and really helped cement many of the ideas I have been implementing over the past 6 months in my new learning experience role. It opened my eyes to how important design thinking is and where some of the crossovers between Learning Experience and User Experience are as a whole.

What is Design Thinking?

Design Thinking is a strategy that became popularized by Tim Brown, David M Kelly, and Roger Martin. It focuses on using a structured human-centered approach to solving problems. It’s gained popularity over the years as businesses began adopting it to respond to growing trends, gain a better understanding of consumers and try to differentiate themselves from competitors.

Using Design Thinking in your Learning Practice

Over the years many variations of Design Thinking that have emerged. This became even more apparent when looking for a graphic to represent the framework. If you simply do a quick google search of Design Thinking you’ll find thousands of graphics showing different steps and processes.

For the sake of simplicity, I’m going to focus on the variation of Design Thinking that Connie emphasized in her workshop. I think it’s a great fit for anyone who is looking to use design thinking in their learning practice.

Screen Shot 2018-04-14 at 9.57.50 AM

EMPATHY

The design process should always start with empathy. This means trying to gain insight and perspective of your target audience. For learning practitioners, this might mean the learners who attend your instructor led training courses, virtual trainings, or watching your eLearning videos. This stage is similar to your traditional audience analysis. Whoever your audience is, try to gain a deeper understanding of their world by putting yourself in their shoes. The best way to gain empathy is to connect with learners directly. You can do this by performing user research in the form of interviews, observations, creating user personas or empathy maps.

 

DEFINE

The next step in the design thinking process is to define the problem your learner is having. You’ll want to look at your findings from your research and see if any patterns begin to emerge. For example, are all of your learners encountering the same problem? Are they feeling a specific way about something?

Once you’ve identified common trends you’ll want to distill all of your findings down into a problem statement or performance goal. You’ll use this to focus on when designing an effective solution.

 

IDEATE

Once you’ve defined the learners problem is when the fun starts to happen! Ideation is when you start to generate possible solutions for your learners performance problem. As an introvert, I tend to do some some of my best thinking alone first then i’ll gather a group of my coworkers and guide a brainstorm session.

While brainstorming, I’ll usually ask others to write their ideas down on post it notes and put them on a white board. Once everyones done writing their ideas we’ll create an affinity diagram and group solutions with common themes together. From there we’ll discuss all of the ideas and pick one or two to create a prototype from.

 

PROTOTYPE

Next, you’ll want to take your the final ideas that you generated with your team and create a prototype. A prototype is a simple and inexpensive model of the ideas you selected.  Prototypes are awesome for testing out your ideas with your users without investing tons of money and resources before you’ve determined whether the solution is successful or not! In other words, it’s a great way to fail quickly.

Depending upon your solution, your prototype could be a paper sketch, exercise, case study, storyboard, wireframe, or interaction concept.

 

TEST

Once you have a prototype, you’ll want to return to your users to solicit feedback. Test out your prototypes and observe how they respond, interact, and their overall experience with it. Be sure to test your prototypes on more than one person.

Don’t worry if your prototype absolutely failed – you’re not meant to get it right on the first try! It’s highly likely that you’ll have to do a few cycles of iterating your prototype and refining your ideas. Once you’ve refined the prototype and you’re confident with how your users are responding to it is when you’ll want to start bringing it to life!

 

Putting it Together

Since leaving the workshop – I realized that I’ve been using Design Thinking in my new role without even realizing it. I feel more confident than ever applying the new methodology to my projects. I actually think i’m actually going through ideation and prototyping faster because of attending the workshop.

For those in the world of learning incorporating Design Thinking into your practice can help eliminate costly development efforts and increase the likelihood that your learning solutions will meet the needs of your users. I definitely recommend trying it out when working on your next project.

Adopting a Performance Support Mindset: The 5 Moments of Learning Need

It should come as no surprise that the way that people are choosing to learn has changed.

Gone are the days of attending multiple days of training to learn a new skill or software program. Instead, learners are looking up content when they need it most.

If I think about all the ways that I learned something over the past few months, I could rattle off a list of answers ranging from articles, books, and videos. Just a few weeks ago when I was putting together a new bookcase for my home office, I quickly flipped through the instructions and put it together in less than 30 minutes. Does this mean I’m doing to become Rhode Island’s Next Top Carpenter? Not a chance! But I did learn just enough to get the task done.

Performance Support Defined

The eLearning Guild defines performance support as “a tool or other resource ranging from print to technology- supported, which provides just the right amount of task guidance, support and productivity benefits to the user, precisely at the moment of need”.

In other words, performance support is a resource available at the moment of need that makes it easier for people to perform. Performance Support is not about teaching someone EVERYTHING there is to know about something; rather it’s about giving them the right amount of support, complexity, or detail right at the time they need it.

This might seem like a new framework to some, but performance support has actually been around for decades in the form of checklists, job-aids, help articles, process diagrams, recipes, you name it.

How to get into the Performance Support Mindset

Two years ago, I read Bob Mosher’s and Con Gottfredson’s book Innovative Performance Support.  The book provides a framework based on the 5 moments of learning need.

The 5 moments of learning need

  1. NEW: When learning something for the first time.
  2. MORE: When you’re seeking to learn more about something.
  3. APPLY: When trying to apply or remember something or adapt performance to a unique situation.
  4. SOLVE: When attempting to solve a problem or deal with something that has gone wrong.
  5. CHANGE: When something changes that requires a change in how work gets done.

The first 2 moments focus on the learner’s knowledge acquisition, whether this means training people on processes, procedures, or concepts for the first time or expanding upon their existing knowledge. The remaining moments of need shift to learners applying their knowledge, solving issues, or adapting to change. It’s helpful to keep in mind, that you would provide a learner with different content and information based on their moment of need. For example, if the learner is trying to solve a problem with a software program they might contact a service desk or read a help article. On the other hand, if they’re learning about an updated sales procedure, the learner may watch a video about the changed process.

Now, think about the 5 moments of learning need and where you may encounter them within your own lives. As you begin to think about the framework, I have a feeling you’ll be amazed with how frequently the moments come up within your day to day tasks.

In my next article, I’ll cover considerations about developing performance support and how to get buy in within your organization.

Ready to learn more?

Check out my Adopting the Performance Support Mindset session at Learning Solutions in March.

ls18-speaker-badge_500x500