Introducing Learn Mindfully

We are witnessing a workplace revolution

It’s no secret that technology has had an impact on today’s workforce. It has changed everything from the way we work, how we work, and where we work; inevitability impacting how we learn and perform on the job.

For years, companies have tried to keep up with the pace of change by spending significantly on workplace learning with little evidence on its impact on employee performance.

In the Learning In The Flow of Work 2018 report, Josh Bersin estimated that the corporate learning market is over $200 billion around the world. As recently as July, Amazon announced it was planning to spend $700 million to retrain 1/3 of its entire workforce to do more high-tech tasks. The writing is on the wall; the trend of workplace learning isn’t going to slow down anytime soon.

Organizations must focus on workplace experiences

Gone are the days that learning takes place in the form of a single training event. The paradigm has shifted to supporting employees during the flow of work. Employees want the most relevant, engaging, and personalized content delivered right at their moment of need. With an increase in their demand for time and growing responsibilities on the job who can blame them?

With so much change happening, our traditional approach to learning is no longer going to cut it. The question now is, what are we going to do about it?

For organizations to be effective, we must focus on providing employees with holistic experiences at their moment of need.

Vision for the future

I believe that learning is the basis for growth and change. By approaching every experience with fresh eyes, we can transform and grow. “Failure” is not seen as something negative but rather an opportunity for improvement.

I believe in a world where employees are at the forefront of everything we do. If we truly understand employees motivations, experiences, and challenges, we can design solutions that meet their needs.

I believe that learning is continuous and can happen anywhere; at home, while working, on the go, or in person. In a world that’s moving faster than ever before this means balancing the demand for employees time with delivering them relevant content at their moment of need.

Introducing Learn Mindfully

Something needs to change with the way that we’re designing and delivering workplace experiences. Learn Mindfully is my attempt to do just that.

Learn Mindfully is a consulting firm dedicated to designing products and experiences for the way people learn and work.

Learn Mindfully helps companies’ take a holistic approach to their workplace performance problems so that they can deliver solutions that meet the needs of today’s workforce.

Learn Mindfully provides three core services:

  • Consulting: Need advice on your learning strategy or project? I’ll collaborate with you to improve your company’s experiences by identifying workplace performance challenges, determining opportunity areas, and making recommendations for improvement.
  • Custom learning design and development: Already have a learning experience in mind and need help to bring it to life? I’ll work with you to create solutions that balance the needs of your employees and organization. 
  • Workshops and Coaching: Need help to upskill your team on a learning experience topic or competency? I offer coaching sessions, workshops, and webinars to help individuals and organizations upskill on learning experience topics and skills.

Let’s work together to design solutions that reach your audience at their moment of need!

Transforming the future of technology learning: 10 years in the making

Ten years ago, I sat in the passengers seat of my fathers Honda Ridgeline as we drove by the Niagara River in Buffalo, NY. My father, a machinist of over 20 years, shared his regrets about how he wished he continued his education. “Education is the only thing that someone can never take away from you” he said, as I listened intently.  He shared his hopes about how I would continue school and chase my dreams despite any obstacles that may get into my way. This conversation has always stayed with me and I frequently think back to it during moments of self reflection.

It should come as no surprise that since then, education and learning have become ingrained into every ounce of my being. My core philosophy in life is that learning is the basis for growth and change. I believe that every experience you have and person you encounter has something to teach you as long as you’re willing to listen. I believe that learning is a fundamental right regardless of gender, race, income level, or where you were born. This belief has guided me through constantly juggling reading at least 3 books at all times (true story – check my goodreads account), undergraduate and graduate degrees, and now the next step in my career.

Thats why, I am absolutely thrilled to announce that I will be joining Pluralsight as a Product Manager.

 

Why Product at Puralsight?

When I began my job search, I knew I wanted a role that would challenge me, align with my learning philosophy, and allow me to make a profound impact on the world.

Product Manager – The epitome of a challenging role

Never in a million years could I have imagined that the next step in my career would be a Product Manager! I’ve worked in tandem with product managers for the past 3.5 years at The Predictive Index and I’ve seen first hand how challenging of a position it can be. So when a good friend of mine actually recommended it to me over 6 months ago, I practically laughed in his face. But as things often do, the idea began to spread through my mind. After countless conversations with those in the SaaS industry, a ton of research (books, conferences, etc), and coaching with my manager; I found myself ready to take on the product manager role. I recognized that a lot of the skills I’ve been utilizing in Learning and UX and all the skills I’m looking to grow we’re encapsulated within a PM role.

 

An aligned mission driven learning philosophy

This past March, I attended UX Fest in Boston and was fortunate enough to see Gilbert Lee, Head of Product @ Pluralsight present. His presentation immediately resonated with me as he talked about the future of workplace technical learning. I remember sitting in the audience thinking “This is why I started in learning!!!”.

The future of workplace education has fascinated me since I began my career in the learning industry nearly 6 years ago. It’s what drove me to pursue my masters in Organizational Performance and Workplace Learning with Boise State and is now what led me to my new role at Pluralsight.

The moment I began talking to the team at Pluralsight, I knew that learning was something that the organization was fundamentally committed to. From considering learning theories during the product development process to their iterative testing culture; learning is truly a shared philosophy across the entire organization.

Overall, I believe that providing just in time digital training is something that is necessary for workers to perform their best on the job. I have always been committed to making that happen for my learners and am grateful to be within an organization that is committed and driven to do the same.

 

Ready for takeoff

I’m so humbled and thrilled to be joining the Pluralsight team! I am so excited to see where this next chapter takes me.

Using information mapping to write clearer content

Last month, I sat down with some of my coworkers to officially hand off knowledge base responsibilities. Since transitioning more fully into my LXD role, I haven’t had the bandwidth to manage them anymore. It was a little bitter sweet, but it’s so exciting to see others step up to the plate and expand their skills.

I ended up reviewing some information mapping best practices to get the team more familiar with creating learning content. The session was so energizing! It reminded me of how much I love getting in front of people to share best practices and how much information mapping has helped to craft my content creation process.

What is information mapping?

Information Mapping is a researched based method that helps enable the creation of clear, concise, and focused writing. It allows content creators to put users needs at the forfont of the creation process.

I got trained in the information mapping methodology roughly 2 years ago and it’s helped every type of content I create. Everything from emails, presentations, documentation, help content, knowledge base articles, the sky’s the limit!

Below is an example before and after it went through the information mapping process. As you can see, information mapping can help to make the content more readable and bring important details to the front of the messages you’re crafting.

beforeafterbig3
Information Mapping – Before and After Example

Getting Started with Information Mapping

You don’t have to go through an information mapping training course to start using it! Here’s some guiding principles to help get you started:

Identify audience needs 

Whenever you’re creating content of any type of content, the first thing you’ll want to do is find out as much as you can about your audience. Ask yourself questions such as:

  • Who is the audience?
  • Are there multiple audiences?
  • What do they need to do?
  • What do they need to KNOW in order to do the task?
  • How will they access the information?

audience

Knowing this will help guide the information you present to your users and make sure that it truly resonates with them.

 

Organize information from the user’s perspective

Once you have a better idea of the content the users will need to know,  it’s time to focus on how you’ll actually present it to your audience.

Screen Shot 2018-05-26 at 1.25.56 PMBe sure to present the content in the order the users will need to use it. This often means introducing high level conceptual information first, then drilling down into more detailed content or steps later.Take a book for example; they’re often composed of multiple short chapters, rather than one long chapter of content. Each chunk of content should represent a new idea or topic.

 

Help users find what they need

Now that you’ve got your content down, it’s time to make some improvements to ensure that users can find the content they need.

Whenever I’m writing instructions or documents, I’ll add subheaders or descriptors to the content chunks in my document. The subheading should accurately convey what appears in it’s corresponding section. If the user is looking for something specific in your document, they’ll be able to quickly find what they’re looking for within the content.

Another best practice that i’ll do when writing directions is begin all sentences or steps with action verbs. For example, this means starting software how to’s with words such as “Click”, “Enter”, or “Select”. This puts the action that the user needs perform, front and center, ensuring theres absolutely no guess work on their end.

I’ll also emphasize words of importance by using italics, bold, or using all caps. In some cases, I’ll actually insert tips if something is really important to the user (ex: TIP: Changing this field will change all of your admin settings).

Finally, I’ll add supportive graphics throughout the document to help ensure that I get my point across. This means including pictures of software screens, machinery, or tools, you’re expecting the users to assemble or use.

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Example Instructions from The Predictive Index Knowledge Base

 

Putting it in action 

And that’s it! The next time you sit down to craft content, begin to incorporate some of these best practices to start getting your messages across to your users quicker.  So go on, and get your information mapping on!

 

Using Design Thinking to Craft Learning Experiences

Last month I was fortunate to attend a Design Thinking workshop with the eLearning guru Connie Malamed. After reading Connie’s blog for over 8 years  I was beyond psyched for the opportunity to meet her in person!

The workshop was absolutely wonderful (as expected) and really helped cement many of the ideas I have been implementing over the past 6 months in my new learning experience role. It opened my eyes to how important design thinking is and where some of the crossovers between Learning Experience and User Experience are as a whole.

What is Design Thinking?

Design Thinking is a strategy that became popularized by Tim Brown, David M Kelly, and Roger Martin. It focuses on using a structured human-centered approach to solving problems. It’s gained popularity over the years as businesses began adopting it to respond to growing trends, gain a better understanding of consumers and try to differentiate themselves from competitors.

Using Design Thinking in your Learning Practice

Over the years many variations of Design Thinking that have emerged. This became even more apparent when looking for a graphic to represent the framework. If you simply do a quick google search of Design Thinking you’ll find thousands of graphics showing different steps and processes.

For the sake of simplicity, I’m going to focus on the variation of Design Thinking that Connie emphasized in her workshop. I think it’s a great fit for anyone who is looking to use design thinking in their learning practice.

Screen Shot 2018-04-14 at 9.57.50 AM

EMPATHY

The design process should always start with empathy. This means trying to gain insight and perspective of your target audience. For learning practitioners, this might mean the learners who attend your instructor led training courses, virtual trainings, or watching your eLearning videos. This stage is similar to your traditional audience analysis. Whoever your audience is, try to gain a deeper understanding of their world by putting yourself in their shoes. The best way to gain empathy is to connect with learners directly. You can do this by performing user research in the form of interviews, observations, creating user personas or empathy maps.

 

DEFINE

The next step in the design thinking process is to define the problem your learner is having. You’ll want to look at your findings from your research and see if any patterns begin to emerge. For example, are all of your learners encountering the same problem? Are they feeling a specific way about something?

Once you’ve identified common trends you’ll want to distill all of your findings down into a problem statement or performance goal. You’ll use this to focus on when designing an effective solution.

 

IDEATE

Once you’ve defined the learners problem is when the fun starts to happen! Ideation is when you start to generate possible solutions for your learners performance problem. As an introvert, I tend to do some some of my best thinking alone first then i’ll gather a group of my coworkers and guide a brainstorm session.

While brainstorming, I’ll usually ask others to write their ideas down on post it notes and put them on a white board. Once everyones done writing their ideas we’ll create an affinity diagram and group solutions with common themes together. From there we’ll discuss all of the ideas and pick one or two to create a prototype from.

 

PROTOTYPE

Next, you’ll want to take your the final ideas that you generated with your team and create a prototype. A prototype is a simple and inexpensive model of the ideas you selected.  Prototypes are awesome for testing out your ideas with your users without investing tons of money and resources before you’ve determined whether the solution is successful or not! In other words, it’s a great way to fail quickly.

Depending upon your solution, your prototype could be a paper sketch, exercise, case study, storyboard, wireframe, or interaction concept.

 

TEST

Once you have a prototype, you’ll want to return to your users to solicit feedback. Test out your prototypes and observe how they respond, interact, and their overall experience with it. Be sure to test your prototypes on more than one person.

Don’t worry if your prototype absolutely failed – you’re not meant to get it right on the first try! It’s highly likely that you’ll have to do a few cycles of iterating your prototype and refining your ideas. Once you’ve refined the prototype and you’re confident with how your users are responding to it is when you’ll want to start bringing it to life!

 

Putting it Together

Since leaving the workshop – I realized that I’ve been using Design Thinking in my new role without even realizing it. I feel more confident than ever applying the new methodology to my projects. I actually think i’m actually going through ideation and prototyping faster because of attending the workshop.

For those in the world of learning incorporating Design Thinking into your practice can help eliminate costly development efforts and increase the likelihood that your learning solutions will meet the needs of your users. I definitely recommend trying it out when working on your next project.